Teens tutor peers online to fill need during pandemic
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — When her suburban Dallas high school was forced to move online last spring because of the coronavirus pandemic, Charvi Goyal realized that the schoolmates she’d been informally tutoring between classes would still need extra help but wouldn’t necessarily be able to get it.
Bus driver in dramatic bridge plunge says it 'just took off'
NEW YORK (AP) — The driver of a New York City bus that plunged off a bridge blamed the dramatic crash on mechanical failure, saying Saturday that the tandem vehicle “just took off” as he slowed into a turn.
Wind, rain, heavy snow batter New England, eastern Canada
BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A storm lashed parts of New England and eastern Canada on Saturday with heavy rain, snow and wind, leading to power outages and slick roads.
March for Life asks its supporters to stay home this year
Organizers of the March for Life, the anti-abortion movement’s preeminent annual event, are asking their supporters nationwide not to gather in Washington this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic and political unrest.
Governors' anger grows as federal vaccine stockpile vanishes
CHICAGO (AP) — Here’s what’s happening Saturday with the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S.: THREE THINGS TO KNOW TODAY — Several governors expressed exasperation at the Trump administration after being assured that the federal government had enough vaccine stockpiled to speed up or expand state rollouts only to be later told those reserves don't exist.
Some in the GOP parrot far-right talk of a coming civil war
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — War-like imagery has begun spreading in Republican circles after the attack on the U.S. Capitol by a mob of President Donald Trump's supporters, with some elected officials and party leaders rejecting pleas to tone down rhetoric calling for a second civil war.
Hell to pay: Arson shakes a Church of Satan community
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. (AP) — Members of the Church of Satan are grieving the destruction of a historic “Halloween House” north of New York City that authorities say was set ablaze this week by an unidentified arsonist.
Fleeing New Yorkers squeeze surrounding housing markets
Angel Garcia, a single father approved for a mortgage loan of $300,000, had high hopes in early 2020 of finding a house he could afford in his hometown of Stamford, Connecticut.
Long road to normalcy: Virtual village connects marathoners
BOSTON (AP) — Organizers of the Boston Marathon — postponed indefinitely because of the coronavirus pandemic — have launched a virtual Athletes’ Village to reproduce at least some of the camaraderie of the real thing.
NRA declares bankruptcy, plans to incorporate in Texas
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The National Rifle Association announced Friday it has filed for bankruptcy protection and will seek to incorporate the nation’s most politically influential gun-rights group in Texas instead of New York, where a state lawsuit is trying to put the organization out of business.
Governors complain over pace of COVID-19 vaccine shipments
Governors bitterly accused the Trump administration Friday of deceiving the states about the amount of COVID-19 vaccine they can expect to receive as they ramp up vaccinations for senior citizens and others.
NY prosecutors interview Michael Cohen about Trump finances
NEW YORK (AP) — New York prosecutors conducted an hourslong interview Thursday of Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former personal attorney, asking a range of questions about Trump's business dealings, according to three people familiar with the meeting.
Flint water charges escalate debate over officials' failures
FLINT, Mich. (AP) — When a former Michigan public health director was charged with involuntary manslaughter in the Flint water crisis, the man who previously held the job says a chilling thought crossed his mind: It could have been me.
California bill would ban intersex surgery for young kids
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A California lawmaker is trying again to ban some medically unnecessary surgeries on intersex children until they are at least 6-years-old, hoping a narrower focus combined with new legislative leadership will be enough to get the first-of-its-kind legislation signed into law.
States declare emergencies, close capitols ahead of rallies
Responding to warnings of potentially violent demonstrations, governors across the nation are calling out National Guard troops, declaring states of emergency and closing their capitols to the public ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration next week.
Online sign-ups complicate vaccine rollout for older people
DENVER (AP) — Howard Jones, who's 83, was on the phone for three to four hours every day trying to sign up for a coronavirus vaccine.
Ex-foreign correspondent reflects on risks for US reporters
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — In the summer of 2000, I was among a group of foreign correspondents, photographers and video journalists who went to England to attend a hostile environment-first aid training course.
VIRUS TODAY: Global death toll for COVID-19 surpasses 2M
Here’s what’s happening Friday with the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S.: THREE THINGS TO KNOW TODAY — The global death toll from COVID-19 has topped 2 million.
Transgender athletes look to changing of White House guard
Transgender athletes are getting an ally in the White House next week as they seek to participate as their identified gender in high school and college sports — although state legislatures, Congress and the courts are all expected to have their say this year, too.
Global death toll from COVID-19 tops 2M amid vaccine rollout
The global death toll from COVID-19 topped 2 million Friday as vaccines developed at breakneck speed are being rolled out around the world in an all-out campaign to vanquish the threat.
Rare sedition charge gains interest after Capitol attack
NEW YORK (AP) — A Civil War-era sedition law being dusted off for potential use in the mob attack on the U.S. Capitol was last successfully deployed a quarter-century ago in the prosecution of Islamic militants who plotted to bomb New York City landmarks.
VIRUS DIARY: Unpacking one vaccination day, step by step
WASHINGTON (AP) — The line stretched nearly a block long. Nobody was grumbling about the wait. Those gathered at a senior wellness center in Washington, D.C., viewed it as a matter of life or death.
Deep South falls behind in coronavirus vaccine drive
ATLANTA (AP) — The coronavirus vaccines have been rolled out unevenly across the U.S., but four states in the Deep South have had particularly dismal inoculation rates that have alarmed health experts and frustrated residents.
2 nuke plants, 1 bribery scandal, no answers: Towns on edge
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — For much of the past four years, the residents of a pair of villages along Lake Erie have been on edge over the fate of their nuclear plants, which generate enough tax money to pay for nicer schools than their neighbors.
Where MLK and Coretta met and studied, a memorial will rise
BOSTON (AP) — A major memorial honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is moving forward in Boston, where they met and studied in the 1950s.